GParted-livecd 0.19.1-1

( 3 reviews )
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GParted-livecd, The power and simplicity of GParted on a LiveCD.

Updated by on Friday, July 18, 2014.

The power and simplicity of GParted on a biz-card size LiveCD. The CD aims to be fast, small in size (~50mb), and use minimal resources to get that disk partitioned the way you want it.

GParted LiveCD uses Xorg, the lightweight Fluxbox manager, and the latest 2.6 Linux Kernel. Being up to date is important. GParted LiveCD will be updated along side the GParted source releases and have minor releases when bugs are fixed or new filesystem tools become available.

The CD also offers the following programs: fdisk, vi, ntfs-3g, partimage, testdisk, Xterm, Midnight Commander.

Iso can be copied on usbstick, boot off usb.

Dowloads:11537
Platforms: x86
0.19.1-1

Latest releases :

 
0.19.1-1 [Stable]
July 18, 2014
Changes
This GParted Live release contains GParted 0.19.1 which includes a critical bug fix to prevent GParted from crashing and potentially losing data.
 
0.14.1-1 [Stable]
Changes
This is a maintenance release that includes important bug fixes, and adds more language translation updates.Some important bugs fixed in this release are:Fix Linux software RAID device detectionFix logical partition grow overlaps extended partition endUse kdesudo on KDE, as gksu is not installed by defaultThe GParted Live 0.14.1-1 image is based on the Debian Sid repository (as of 2012/Dec/13).
 
0.14.0-1 [Stable]
Changes
Added ability to move, resize, check, create, and delete Physical Volumes under Logical Volume Management - LVM2

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Contact Information

Author / maintainer:
LarryT
Web site:
http://gparted.sourceforge.net/index.php

User reviews

Displaying 1 of 1 comments.
GParted-livecd - excellent
By pediatracancun on Monday, January 22, 2007.

Very good program, specially if you don't know all the commands that you need to type in a terminal in order to partition your disk(s). I have a secondary hard disk, SATA, where I had installed several Linux distributions; I wanted to erase whatever was in the HD, but when installing the Linux distribution, althought it says that it will reformat that area, in reality it doesn't, so information keeps accumulating in the disk. With GParted I erased all the partitions and created the partitions in the disk as I wanted and needed.

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